Wednesday, January 25, 2006

NAR-NI-A! NAR-NI-A! (part two)

"Discovering the Heart of Narnia" in Crossroad 77 last night was a nice event. There were lots of people in Narnian costumes. Boiled brown eggs, toasted bread, sardines, tea, and Turkish delight was served. Just like in the book/movie! = ) So I finally got to taste Turkish delight! = ) It's this gelatin-y sweetie. REALLY sweet. Just a little bit is enough for me. Now that I think of Edmund chomping down on the stuff I feel kinda sick. It's so sweet! A little bit goes a long way, man.

The entrance to the venue was a wardrobe door. We had to walk into the wardrobe and through coats to get to the "snowy woods" room! COOLNESS! There were "Narnian games." (The Edmund who eats the most Turkish delights will be the king of Narnia!) We got to watch clips of the BBC version of The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. And I got a lot of spiritual insights about The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe from "King Caesar Conde the Wise, from the High Mountains of Valiant Dreams," the speaker for the night. = ) I've always thought/known that "King Caesar" would make a great university professor. That was confirmed last night. He imparted spirituals truths in/from The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe using the Socratic method of teaching by asking questions (instead of telling/lecturing/preaching). His "talk" reminded me of a GOOD university class. = )


There are some things I really have to get off my chest.

The Chronicles of Narnia are NOT allegory. It really annoys me every time a movie critic refers to The Chronicles as Christian allegory. First of all, The Chronicles do not fit the definition of allegory: "in literature, symbolic story that serves as a disguised representation for meanings other than those indicated on the surface. The characters in an allegory often have no individual personality, but are embodiments of moral qualities and other abstractions" (from Yahoo.com). And secondly, C. S. Lewis did not intend The Chronicles to be allegory. He discouraged people from reading The Chronicles as allegory. The Chronicles are SUPPOSITION. God is God, and He is the God of everything. SUPPOSING there was another world, God would be the God of that world too. How, then, would He rule that other world? What would the story of salvation be like in that world? Lewis believed that Narnia answered SUPPOSALS/"what if" questions. What if Jesus became incarnate in a different sort of world as a lion? What if He had to save that world too? THIS IS NOT ALLEGORY AT ALL.

I also don't like it when people compare the Narnia movie to the Lord of the Rings movies. First of all, the Lord of the Rings movie trilogy is complete. We have yet to see and judge the other Narnia films. Secondly, we have to remember the context of a movie before we judge it. For example, we wouldn't expect a mushy romantic comedy from Quentin Tarantino now, would we? The Lord of the Rings was written for adults. The Chronicles were written for children. The Lord of the Rings movie trilogy is from New Line Cinema. The Narnia movie is from Walden Media and Disney Pictures. Walden Media makes movies for children. Disney Pictures makes movies for "the family."

P.S. Bridge to Terabithia (based on the beautiful book by Katherine Paterson) starts filimg in NEW ZEALAND this month. Yipee! This movie project is also from Walden Media and Disney Pictures. I love Walden Media! I love Disney! = ) The main character, Jess, will be played by that cute kid in Zathura and Little Manhattan. = ) I think he's perfect for the role. Walden Media is also going to make the film adaptation of The Giver by Lois Lowry, another beautiful book for children! I don't know if Disney will be involved with that as well. And I don't know when they will start filming for The Giver.

No comments: